This Fortnight In History

• On September 1, 1904, Cardinals pitcher Reginald "Pants" Dixon was beaned in the head by one of his own pitches. • On September 2, 1906, Reginald "Pants" Dixon mistakenly arrived in Pittsburgh for a game against Philadelphia. Dixon pitched five innings against the Pirates anyway, getting tagged for a 5-0 loss.

• On September 3, 1906, Reginald "Pants" Dixon attempted to steal first. The catcher was too confused to make a pick-off throw, but Dixon slipped and fell halfway to the base. After regaining his composure, he calmly walked back to the batter's box, and struck out on the next pitch.

• On September 4, 1905, Reginald "Pants" Dixon lost track of a pop fly in the sun, and kept waving off his teammates to make the catch even after the ball was caught to end the inning. The opposing pitcher was too polite to say anything, so he took his warm-up tosses around him.

• On September 5, 1907, Reginald "Pants" Dixon broke both legs sliding into third base. (His slide left him nearly eight feet short of the bag.)

• On September 6, 1905, Reginald "Pants" Dixon made the lone start of his career — and by some accounts, of his entire life — behind the plate. Both of St. Louis' catchers were out with food poisoning, so players drew straws in the clubhouse before the game. Dixon drew the short straw. In all, he was charged with 11 passed balls and struck by 23 pitches, at one point attempting to set up behind the umpire. Dixon was benched in the sixth, and in his absence the Cardinals rallied back to win 14-12.

• On September 7, 1907, after falling asleep in the bullpen, Reginald "Pants" Dixon mistook his seventh inning relief appearance for a start. When the game ended three innings later, Dixon assumed it was because of impending rain.

• On September 8, 1908, Reginald "Pants" Dixon complained of headaches throughout a 7-2 loss to the Giants. After the game it was determined that he was wearing the bat boy's cap.

• On September 9, 1906, Reginald "Pants" Dixon admitted to the press his agonizing fear of dirigibles.

• On September 10, 1909, Reginald "Pants" Dixon stumbled on the third base chalk line while walking onto the field, hit his head, and lost consciousness. Eddie Higgins started in his place and shut down the Braves 6-0.

• On September 11, 1906, Reginald "Pants" Dixon beaned three consecutive home plate umpires, knocking out all three. Only one reserve umpire was on hand, so when the third base ump came in to call ball & strikes, the reserve ump had the whole field to himself. Dixon knocked him out with a line drive in his next at-bat.

• On September 12, 1908, the infamous "barrel incident" occurred in St. Louis. After Reginald "Pants" Dixon and Julian "Shrap" McGuiness were both shelled and yanked from the game by the second inning, the pitchers nearly got into a brawl outside the visitors' clubhouse. Tensions boiled after the game when the two happened upon each other in a bar, and in the ensuing fight McGuiness stuffed Dixon into a barrel and rolled him down Vandeventer Avenue. Dixon finally crasheed to a halt in some bushes, and eventually walked home with the barrel still stuck over his head and torso.

• On September 13, 1909, Reginald "Pants" Dixon was attacked by a pelican while taking the mound for the bottom of the fifth. Dixon fled the field, and the bird received a standing ovation as it flew away.

• On September 14, 1913, Reginald "Pants" Dixon pitched his last game, taking on Julian "Schrap" McGuiness one more time. For his part, McGuiness never let a runner past second base. Dixon repeatedly tripped on the pitching rubber — and somehow bounces a pitch off the third base bag — but managed to take a perfect game two outs into the ninth inning. On the final pitch of his career, Dixon gave up a game-winning home run to the last hitter in the order: McGuiness. In the year following Dixon's retirement, the Cardinals posted their first winning record of the 20th century.